Custom Transferrable 7mm BAR

Want to play He-Man shooting a BAR from the shoulder? This one has been built for just that purpose. It’s chambered in 7x57mm for reduced recoil, has a 21” barrel to improve handling, a custom lengthened pistol grip, safe-semi-full trigger group, good early M1918 pattern sights, and Bren Gun tripod mounting brackets for when you get tired. A neat example of a customized beast of an automatic rifle!

 

16 Comments

  1. If I’m not mistaken, the postwar FN-D (the BAR with detachable quick-change barrel and pistol grip) was made in 7 x 57, I believe for Venezuela and perhaps other former Spanish colonies. I know from experience that a 7 x 57 Mauser is much more pleasant to shoot that a .30-06 Springfield; seems like this would be amplified in a shoulder-fired full-auto.

  2. When I first saw it, I thought it was an FN Model 30 aka Model D due to the pistol grip. FN made their version of the BAR in several calibers, .30-06, 7.9 x 57, 7.65 x 53, 6.5 x 55 and, yes, 7 x 57. They’d make it in whatever caliber a customer desired.

    Model 30/D BARs had a shorter pistol grip, like the Colt Monitor, but more importantly they were the only production BARs with quick-change barrels, like a ZB/Bren. Hence they were the only BARs capable of the same degree of sustained fire as a Bren. Many of them also had a Cutts Compensator-type muzzle brake/flash hider, again like the Colt version. This probably went a ways toward reducing the rather exuberant recoil of a .30-06 or 7.9 x 57 example on Auto.

    Since most of the cartridges used the same bolt face and even the same magazines, theoretically, at least, you could have one Model 30 with barrels in any or all of the calibers, and switch them depending on the local ammunition availability. (The ideal rifle for Indiana Jones, actually.)

    As for the 7 x 57 round, all the “intermediate” cartridges in .276 and etc. developed in the last century, up to and including the modern 6.8 SPC, essentially are ballistic duplicates of the 7 x 57. Some of them are even near-duplicates of its case dimensions and profile.

    I’ve often wondered when everybody trying to come up with the “ultimate intermediate cartridge” for military use will stop trying to re-invent the wheel and realize that DWM got it right the first time in 1892.

    cheers

    eon

    • The problem is that the politically-minded guys responsible for arms procurement will dismiss the 7×57 as “ancient history not applicable to modern warfare.” Who uses “deer hunting ammunition” on humans? Technically any soldier will do that, except he shouldn’t use hollow point bullets… and no need for me to reference the Kennedy shots for small caliber nastiness!

      • “problem is that the politically-minded guys responsible for arms procurement will dismiss the 7×57”
        In fact, there exist limitations of 7×57 which are purely technical. Most obvious it is relatively big mass compared to ballistic. Although able to compete with more modern options in terms of pure ballistic, it is weaker in effectiveness (reach similar ballistic but with weight penalty). This is effect of geometry of cartridge and material used for case (or to be more precise density of that material).
        In term of overall mass of single cartridge 7×57 is comparable with 7.62×51 NATO. It does not have significant enough ballistic advantage over 7.62×51 to grant its introduction for world-wide military service.

    • “Model 30/D BARs had a shorter pistol grip, like the Colt Monitor, but more importantly they were the only production BARs with quick-change barrels”
      Wait, what about Kg m/1937?
      https://modernfirearms.net/en/machineguns/sweden-machineguns/kg-m21-m37-eng/

      ” .30-06, 7.9 x 57, 7.65 x 53, 6.5 x 55 and, yes, 7 x 57″
      Kg m/1921 (also described in link above) used 6.5 x 55 cartridge, which should together with moderate Rate-of-Fire equal to 500 rpm, make it relatively easy to control in full-auto.

    • “As for the 7 x 57 round, all the “intermediate” cartridges in .276 and etc. developed in the last century, up to and including the modern 6.8 SPC, essentially are ballistic duplicates of the 7 x 57. Some of them are even near-duplicates of its case dimensions and profile. ”
      Case dimensions, which one?
      7 x 57 is just long (~ 78 mm overall) for ballistic it deliver compared to more modern solutions. For comparison 6.8 SPC: ~ 57 mm. This has following consequence: it is easier to craft automatic weapon with greater Rate-of-Fire for 6.8 SPC than 7 x 57.

  3. I looked recently at video by Hickok45 shooting BAR. To my surprise, he being a man of age, was shooting it standing and in bursts. Admittedly, the gun is heavy (and he mentioned that in video) enough to allow this. In any case, this was a masterpiece by J. Browning.

    • ” In any case, this was a masterpiece by J. Browning.”
      In original (Great War-era) form BAR might be described as assault rifle but without intermediate cartridge. Later attempts on converting it to light-machine gun ended in limited success. One of reasons was fixed barrel (not quick-change feature) other was it magazine placement – as it sticked downwards it was harder to change for 2-man crew in comparison to Madsen for example, also it had limited magazine capacity for light-machine gun.

  4. I could be mistaken but I believe to selector on the BAR to be slow “A” and fast “F”. Not semi. A function check would determine this.

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