CETME-L Flats: HMG vs Prexis

You may recall a while back I picked up a CETME-L flat from Prexis, because it was the only option available for building a CETME-L rifle. Well, there is now another option available.

Hill & Mac Gunworks made a run of completed CETME-L rifles, and is also now offering builders’ kits, with barrels, weldment blocks, semauto and 922(r) conversion parts, receiver flats, and bending jigs, along with CETME-L parts kits – everything needed to build one of the guns (as of the time of this posting, flats and weldment blocks are available to order, with complete kits coming soon). I spent the last couple days building one with my friend and InRange TV co-host Karl, and we will be posting a series of tutorial videos to walk folks through the build process shortly.

However, before that publishes I thought it would be worth a quick post to point out the differences between the Prexis and HMG receiver flats. It is true that a handful of people have actually received flats from Prexis and managed to build them into working guns, but that is an excruciating process. The HMG flat and jig, on the other hand, actually work fantastically well. Let’s take a look at why…

(Note: All of the photos here use a Gen 1 Prexis flat, because those are the ones I have been able to get my hands on. The Gen 2 flat is reportedly better, but as far as I can see one would have to be crazy to actually pay money for a Prexis product)

Left: HMG Right: Prexis
Left: HMG; Right: Prexis
Left: HMG Right: Prexis
Left: HMG; Right: Prexis

 

Ejection ports - the Prexis ejection port is actually so undersized that a live rounds is too long to fit through it. The Eject a live round, one would have to drop the magazine and get it out through the magazine well.
Ejection ports (HMG on top, Prexis below) – the Prexis ejection port is actually so undersized that a live rounds is too long to fit through it. To eject a live round, one would have to drop the magazine and get it out through the magazine well.

 

Proxies left, HMG right. The Prexis locating hole is inside the receiver material, while HMG's is an extensions trimmer off after bending, which does not leave a hole in the finished product.
Proxies left, HMG right. The Prexis locating hole is inside the receiver material, while HMG’s is an extensions trimmer off after bending, which does not leave a hole in the finished product. Als0, note the significant difference in depth and definition of the reinforcing features.

 

This
The magazine well area really highlights the quality differences between the two flat (Prexis top, HMG below)

 

IMG_3321
Selector switch area. It is relevant to note that disassembly on the CETME-L involves the fire control group and safety moving a short distance forward and backward. The HMG flat allows this; the Prexis flat was made without an understanding of this feature, and that feature must be substantially modified to make a functioning gun.

 

Selector switch area from the other side (Prexis top, HMG bottom)
Selector switch area from the other side (Prexis top, HMG bottom). Also note that the HMG holes for the fire control group and buttstock pins are properly sized, where the Prexis holes and just locators that need to be drilled out.

 

IMG_3325
Magazine well and catch. The HMG flat has holes properly spaced for both the trigger pack pin and the magazine catch pin, as well as the proper full cutout for the magazine latch itself. The Prexis flat has a misquote magazine catch hole, not FCG pin hole, and an undersized mag catch pin hole.

 

Looking down the length of the Prexis flat. Compare this to the photo below...
Looking down the length of the Prexis flat. Compare this to the photo below…

 

Looking down the HMG flat. Notice how much crisper the stiffening features are.
Looking down the HMG flat. Notice how much crisper the stiffening features are, and how the bolt guide rails are straight, flat, and how it actually has a bolt hold open cutout. Also, the HMG flat is thicker than the Prexis, matching proper original specification for the CETME-L.

If you’ve been waiting to do a CETME-L build, now there is finally a usable flat available. If you have already gotten a barrel somewhere and are a skilled builder, the HMG flat and weldments will get you going. Otherwise, I would suggest waiting until HMG’s full builder’s kits are available, so you can get all the necessary components in one package. Having just finished building one myself, I know they are a good product.

 

29 Comments

  1. “922(r) conversion parts”
    What this is? Never heard about that, but I don’t have big knowledge about CETME rifles.

    “flat”
    Does anyone have photo of this element as used to do original CETME-L? I wonder how they compare to these elements.

    • “922(r)” is not CETME-specific, it is a US law issue.
      There are guns that can legally be manufactured inside the US, but can not legally be imported into the US.
      A gun that consists entirely of imported parts, and is only assembled in the US, counts as “imported” – so you have to use some US-made parts.

  2. Have already purchased 2 flats with weldments from them awaiting delivery in early saw there stg44 was impressed also have 2 reactive targets and was also impressed . looking forward to the build .thanks hmg

  3. Have already purchased 2 flats with weldments from them awaiting delivery in early August saw there stg44 was impressed also have 2 reactive targets and was also impressed . looking forward to the build .thanks hmg

  4. With having some experience building guns, for now, I will stick with the Prexis flat for $129.00 VS the $250.00 price tag. I MUST NOTE,I have build my share of MP5’s Cetmes and H&K’s, so it is not like I would be jumping in blind. That could make a big difference for someone whom never built a rifle of that style.

  5. I consider the very high $250 price tag for the HMG flat to be prohibitive. For that price it should be bent and welded (and considered a Firarm)

      • As the old saying goes, you only get what you pay for. And even an “inexpensive” handgun will cost you considerably more that 2.5 C-notes today.

        I’d class the HMG flat as a bargain, and I’m not even a trained machinist.

        cheers

        eon

  6. It is a simple question of economics, A press tool to produce the flats costs 50,000-100,000 dollars so that the price each

    is that divided by how many you will sell so that is why one is more expensive because not that many will be sold when maybe

    thousands of CETME C flats will be sold.

    Personally I consider it cheap.

  7. This is fantastic news! I picked up both a Cetme L and a Cetme LV kit from Apex and after reeding about your experience with the Prexis flat I was worried that they would never get built. Well I’m heading on over to hmgunworks.com to order a jig and a few flats/weld kits.

    I cant wait to start building along with your videos.
    Thatcher

  8. Does this flat have the ability to have the rear ejection port “flare” formed? It looks like they forgot that detail in the stamping which would be a shame after putting in so much time and effort. I hope I’m wrong as having near 100% correct appearance is important (to me personally), not to mention it’s a functional feature.

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