The Vault

Book Review: Collector’s Guide to Tokarev Pistols

Today we have a copy of John Remling’s work, a “Collector’s Guide to Tokarev Pistols”. It’s a thin volume, but a good introduction and basic reference to the development of the TT33 Tokarev pistol and the different nations that adopted it.

Unfortunately, it does appear to be out of print, and I was not able to find a reliable source where you could buy a copy. So keep your eyes open at gun shows, because it is a good value for the money when you find it used.

4 comments to Book Review: Collector’s Guide to Tokarev Pistols

  • Did you check here?. If not, maybe you should suggest it.

  • I swear I have a hardcover copy of this Is it an earlier edition? I got it after finding a few TT-30s in the foreign weapons arms rooms (two mixed in with the TT-33s at Bragg and one alongside two TT-33s at 10th Group).

    Mechanical training on obsolete foreign weapons have been deemphasized in the last 30 years and one expects those weapons have probably been scrapped.

    The most interesting characteristic of the TT is its complete absence of a mechanical safety. (Who did Fyodor Tokarev think he was, Gaston Glock?) Starting with the Tokagypt 58, I believe, we started to see a simple hammer-locking safety on these things, especially those made for commercial resale and the ones made for the US market.

    There is a half-cock notch on the hammer… otherwise, you observe Cooper’s four rules.

    Most of the changes from TT-30 to -33 seem to me to be aimed at reducing machine time and production cost.

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