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RSC 1917: France’s WW1 Semiauto Rifle at RIA

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Did you know that the French Army issued more than 80,000 semiautomatic rifles during WWI? They had been experimenting with a great many semiauto designs before the war, and in 1916 finalized a design for a rotating bolt, long stroke gas piston rifle (with more than few similarities to the M1 Garand, actually) which would […]

Q&A Video, November 2015

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Thanks to the awesome people supporting Forgotten Weapons through Patreon for sending in more questions that I could get to for another month!

This month the subjects include:

Browning lock vs others in handguns Best modern weapon for WWI Turret revolvers Affordable “forgotten weapons” Welrod pistol C&R rifle parts sources WWII souvenir? Finnish firearms […]

Union Pistol w/35-Round Horseshoe Magazine (Video)

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“Union” was a trade name used by French and Spanish arms manufacturers (as well as American, actually) – but this particular Union is a French example. Among their many variations of pistols available (25, 32, long, short, extended barrels, etc) was a fully automatic version. For that pistol, they also developed a 35-round “horseshoe” magazine […]

Q&A Video #1: H&K G11, Owen, F1, Worst Gun Ever, and More!

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As part of my new fundraising system on Patreon, I am starting a monthly Q&A video series, answering questions from Patreon contributors. The support from you folks is a tremendous help to me in running the site, and I really appreciate it! This month I am addressing:

H&K G11 (and caseless rifles in general) Origins […]

Belgian 1886 Rifle Trials Report (Translated to English)

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Our friend Thibaud has spent some time translating a report from the Belgian 1886 rifle trials into English – thank you, Thibaud!

He notes that the text has a lot of specifically Belgian terminology and phraseology from that period which is not in common use anymore, and has included explanatory details in [square brackets] when […]

Most Unusual Over/Under Shotgun I’ve Seen at James D Julia

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Is that perhaps too ambitious of a title? I really don’t have much I can say about this one – beyond it being made in Paris by Lefaucheux, I don’t know anything about it’s history or development. I do know that I have never seen another shotgun with this type of action, though…


The Chauchat: Shooting, History, and Tactics (Video)

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I hope everyone had a successful weekend with the Rock Island auction that just ended! For those of you who still have some money left, there is a James D. Julia auction coming up in a couple weeks with a whole bunch more very cool guns. Today marks the first of a series of videos […]

RIA: Hotchkiss Revolving Cannon Reproduction

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The Hotchkiss Revolving Cannon was developed in the 1870s as a competitor to the other manually-operated machine guns of the era, guns like the Gatling, Gardner, and Nordenfelt to name a few. What made the Hotchkiss stand out is that while the other guns were mostly built in rifle calibers, with larger options available, the […]

Heavy Machine Guns of the Western Front, WWI

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I have been really enjoying The Great War series on YouTube (a rolling weekly account of what happened in WWI this week 100 years ago), so I figured I ought to take advantage of an opportunity to look at several WWI heavy machine guns side by side. This is a video to give some […]

Vintage Saturday Correction: Spare a Light?

French officer with a Lebel rifle and barrel-mounted light

Long-time reader and commenter Eon took a closer look at yesterday’s photo and recognized what I had not – it isn’t a line-throwing rifle, it’s a light mounted under the barrel. His comment in full:

The “can” definitely has an electrical connection at its bottom rear. The double-stranded line from it leads to a switch […]